Meet Mia

Meet Mia

Getting dressed left Mia depressed. She feared that her less than professional wardrobe kept her from getting the promotions that she’d earned. And, Mia knew that her ill-fitting clothes weren’t helping her social life- she often said no to outings with friends because she had nothing to wear.

“You’d think I’d be better at this since I grew up in a family of fashionistas. But I’m a ‘big girl’ and perpetually on a diet so my closet looks like Marshalls on a Saturday afternoon. Ugh!”

“You’d think I’d be better at this since I grew up in a family of fashionistas.”

“I’m tired of struggling with my body. I want to feel good- and look good, too- in clothes that I like. Can you help me or should I call Omar the Tent Maker to make my clothes?” she laughingly asked.

“Don’t call Omar just yet,” I answered.

When Mia looked in the mirror all she saw was fat. She desperately needed an accurate mental image of her shape so I asked her to back up to a blank sheet of paper on the wall and I traced her silhouette. Using the drawing, I pointed out Mia’s physical assets. She was delighted to discover that she has straight shoulders, shapely legs, and a narrow rib cage.

“Narrow rib cage? No one has ever called a part of me narrow before!” she said, tearing up a little. “I can’t believe that’s me! I’ve actually got an hourglass shape.”

“I can’t believe that’s me! I’ve actually got an hourglass shape.”

“Yes, you do! Seeing yourself as you really are feels great, doesn’t it?” I replied.

The next step was a full closet audit. Mia’s closet was stuffed with clothes in a wide range of sizes: her “thin clothes,” “fat clothes” and “extra fat clothes”. Brand new, never-worn dresses and shirts were shoved to the back of the closet serving only to shame Mia about wasting money on clothes that never really fit.

We ditched the clothes that she hated or didn’t work for her and kept only the items that made Mia glow and celebrated her assets. I pointed out how we can use the fashionable clothes that Mia craves to direct the eye to her assets. We talked about the clothes she needed for her desired lifestyle and ripped out magazine pictures for a look book of the styles, colors and patterns that she liked. We honed in on the basic pieces to shop for first.

Then, it was time to go shopping! But first I had to remove the mystery behind the little number on the label that can turn normally rational women like Mia into mental cases. “A numerical size is nothing more than an industry tool used to manufacture the product line. It’s a place to start when trying on clothes. It means nothing else– not about your weight or your worth!” I said on our way to the mall.

Mia’s fashion education continued as she tried on clothes. She was chatting about her work while trying on a cocktail dress when she suddenly fell silent. A few seconds later, Mia stumbled out of the cramped dressing room laughing so hard that she couldn’t talk and tears were streaming down her face. When she caught her breath she posed and said, “I look like a character from Gone with the Wind!” setting us both off laughing. Since Mia was not a historical reenactor, we decided to move on to the next dress.

As we continued, she became increasingly frustrated about how tailored clothes fit her, “Nothing I’ve tried on looks like it does on the models– even plus-size models.”

The clothes you see in magazines and catalogs are covered in clamps, pins and tape to tailor the clothes to look perfect on that particular model– it’s an illusion.

“Off the rack clothes, particularly structured clothes, rarely fit anyone perfectly! The clothes you see in magazines and catalogs are covered in clamps, pins and tape to tailor the clothes to look perfect on that particular model– it’s an illusion. That’s why we start by selecting silhouettes that work with your shape and speak to your aesthetic and style. Then, we take the clothes to a good tailor for some custom nips and tucks,” I replied.

It took a few days of coaching (and shopping) to dissolve Mia’s deeply ingrained beliefs about clothes and her right to dress fashionably for her size. But now Mia has a deep appreciation for her shape and assets, a clear sense of style and the “grab and go closet” that she wanted full of work and play clothes that let her shine.

Do you have a closet full of clothes and nothing to wear?

If so, let’s schedule a free, no-strings attached, 20-minute phone chat to see if we’re a good match for Attire Revolution wardrobe coaching.